Let Buganda turn Lubiri into her Vatican city

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Arial view of Lubiri
Arial view of Lubiri
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In this world you either evolve or die

Milk shakes come in all flavors, you can basically mix whatever you want add some milk and call it a milk shake. Looking ahead the issue of who is a Muganda will be a definition of a milk shake. We are up to a point where the lineage cannot be defined.

This brings me to the issue of the Lubiri. I grew around this perimeter and I revered it together with the Bulange.

It so happens that the Kingdom is so engrossed in collecting funds and they are putting the issue of maintaining the tribal aspects on the side. By the way I think you can definitely do both.

My idea of the Lubiri will be a big museum of the kingdom, to put it better the enclosure can be used to create the liking of a Vatican, a state within in a state.

This will not only reduce the expense of the kingdom but it will consolidate all the aspects of the kingdom in one prime spot.

The sky is the limit as to what can be done in an enclosure like that, ranging from using Luganda as the only language when you step in fence, Buganda banks, school, a post office for each clan, let you minds roll.

This can all be done in the concept that monies can even be collected, a hotel, in the enclosure, a function hall. I mean take all the Buganda kingdom and start running its business in one place.

The result will be that with the concentration of all activities the pride to the kingdom will be restored and somehow we can preserve our history. Let us have a library for each and every king.

In this world you either evolve or die. The thinking of those who govern the Buganda kingdom is locked in the past, it won’t be long when all those who call them selves Baganda will all be different brands of Milk shakes.

For those who think this is far fetched, Information from wikpedia.org copied below illustrates how the Vatican works.

The Vatican is on a 109 acre land, smaller than the Lubiri. The Vatican City has its own post office, fire brigade, police service, commissary (supermarket), bank (the automatic teller machines are the only ones in the world to offer customers service in Latin, among other languages), railway station, electricity generating plant, and publishing house. The Vatican also controls its own Internet domain (.Va), it has the Vatican Radio.

This unique, non-commercial economy is also supported financially by contributions (known as Peter’s Pence) from Catholics throughout the world, the sale of postage stamps and tourist mementos, fees for admission to museums, and the sale of publications. The incomes and living standards of lay workers are comparable to, or somewhat better than, those of counterparts who work in the city of Rome.

The Vatican City issues its own coins. It has used the euro as its currency since January 1,1999, owing to a special agreement with the EU (council decision 1999/98/CE). Euro coins and notes were introduced in January 1, 2002. Due to its rarity, Vatican euro coins are highly sought by collectors. Until the adoption of the Euro, Vatican coinage and stamps were denominated in their own Vatican lira currency, which was on par with the Italian lira.
It also has its own bank, Istituto per le Opere di Religione (also known as the Vatican Bank, and with the acronym IOR).

Budget: Revenues (2003) $252 million; expenditures (2003) $264 million.
Industries: printing and production of few mosaics and staff uniforms; worldwide banking and financial activities.

Almost all of Vatican City’s 932 citizens live inside the Vatican’s walls. The Vatican citizenry consists mainly of clergy, including high dignitaries, priests, nuns, as well as the Swiss Guard. There are also about 3,000 lay workers who comprise the majority of the Vatican work force, but who reside outside the Vatican. All of the City’s citizens are Roman Catholic and Roman Catholicism is, rather obviously, the State religion of the country. There are no other places of worship inside the Vatican City other than private Catholic Chapels and St Peter’s Basilica.

The official language is Latin. Italian and, to a lesser extent, other languages are generally used for most conversations, publications, and broadcasts. German is the official language of the Swiss Guard. The Vatican’s official website languages are Italian, German, English, French, Spanish, and Portuguese.

Awangaale Ayi Ssabassajja

Dr.Eddie Kayondo, M.D
UAH member in USA

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